Compassion

Tell them not to speak evil of anyone, but to be peaceful and friendly, and always to show a gentle attitude toward everyone. For we ourselves were once foolish, disobedient, and wrong. Titus 3: 2-3a

It’s so hard to keep from judging others. People do so many stupid, infuriating, hurtful things. So how do we begin?

We might start by admitting that if we’re looking at others’ failings, it doesn’t mean we don’t have any ourselves; it just means we aren’t paying attention to them. So when we look down on others, it might help to call to mind the times we’ve done thoughtless, hurtful things. In fact, the things that annoy us most about others are often the very traits we have ourselves. You spot it, you got it, as they say.

We don’t have to beat ourselves up over the poor choices we’ve made. We can be honest about them but still offer ourselves some compassion. Jesus welcomed those who were well-aware of their own shortcomings. No wonder prostitutes and tax collectors flocked to him. We tend to be open and receptive to those who are friendly and welcoming.

When we ease up on ourselves, we naturally ease up on others, too. We’re all in this together. Only One is perfect and he offered himself for us and for those we look down on.

Prayer: Lord, help me see myself and others with eyes of compassion.

Reflection: Who do you look down on? What do you have in common with them?

Copyright 2017, Barbara Hosbach

Barbara Hosbach

Barbara Hosbach

Barbara Hosbach, writer, speaker, and retreat facilitator, blogs about scripture at www.biblemeditations.net . Co-chair of the CJ Chapter of the Catholic Writers Guild and member of the Catholic Press Association, Hosbach’s articles have appeared in a number of Catholic periodicals. Her latest book, Your Faith Has Made You Well: Jesus Heals in the New Testament, explores what happened when Jesus healed and what it means for us today.

Your Faith Has Made You Well: Jesus Heals in the New Testament and

Fools, Liars, Cheaters, and Other Bible Heroes

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